Frugal and Floral Fun – The Botanical Gardens

frugal and floral

Frugal and Floral Fun on a Dime

I don’t know why I hadn’t gone before, but when a dear friend visiting this summer treated us to a trip to the Botanical Garden of the Ozarks we had a blast! This frugal and floral experience fits in the budget rather easily. Click here for admission fees and information if you live in or are planning to visit Northwest Arkansas. There is a kid’s section complete with a human-size bird’s nest accessible by bridge, reading railroad, and a wonderful little butterfly house. We will definitely be going back.

Frugal and Floral Fun in the Children’s Garden

This is a beautiful area for the kids to play in with a sculpted cement tree, magnet wall, and even a small pond. The reading rainbow train has couches for train cars. There is also a very large walking stick sculpture that makes for a great photo op if you have multiple kids old enough to sit on it.

The Butterfly House

This small, but beautiful little screened-in oasis was a hit with the kids. There are gorgeous flowers, sculptures, and of course butterflies inside a beautifully designed structure.

Walking Trail and Other Gardens

The paths are easy to follow to the different gardens if you have kids in tow or even a stroller. I definitely plan to go back when it is a little cooler outside. With events and activities year-round from firefly nights to Christmas events we can be sure to find the time for this frugal and floral activity!

There is also a native plants garden, and a chicken coop ( which is almost always a hit with small children), which are not pictured here.

The Japanese garden with the koi pond provides a nice bit of shade to sit in and cool off and looking for fish was entertaining for our bigger butterflies. This is definitely a must-see for Northwest Arkansas. My only complaint is why didn’t I go before?!

Please follow and like us:
error

10 Under $10 to Save You Time and Money

save time and money

Make Life a Little Easier

Life can be hard. And it can be expensive. If you’re living that budget life like I am chances are you are always on the lookout for anything that will save you a little time, money, sanity, or all three. Here is a list of 10 under $10 I’ve curated to do just that!

These items align with goals I have been working toward and at around $10 these items definitely qualify as frugal.

*As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.*

10 Under $10

10 under $10
  1. Meal prepping and cooking at home can save you a lot of time and money, but if you don’t know where to start, get a meal prepping cookbook like this one by Alea Milham. The Kindle version is only $9.99. A small investment like this one can save you hundreds of dollars a year if not more in the long run.

productivity journal

2. A good productivity journal or planner like this Shine Bright diary for $9.35 can help keep you organized. Write down appointments, bill due dates, even work up your monthly budget and to-do lists on these customizable pages. If you aren’t feeling particularly creative pick out a planner with preset calendar pages instead.

10 under $10

3. I hate using a store’s plastic shopping bags; I have to take them back to Walmart to recycle. That is why I love reusable shopping bags and am looking to replace my Aldi ones – store ones rip. A few sturdy canvas bags like this one for $6.95 seems like a much better option. This one is natural cotton and customizable!

10 under $10

4. If you love coffee a stainless steel travel mug is a must. This Jura 20 oz tumbler is just $8.95 and has an average rating of 5 stars with over 1500 reviews! Sounds like a pretty good mug. It also has a straw and two lid functions. Brew your own coffee at home for pennies a day or take your own travel mug to your favorite coffee shop or convenience store for a discount!

k-cup reusable filters

5. Speaking of brewing at home, if you use a single-serve brewer you know K-cups are not cheap compared to ground coffee bought in bulk. And they generate a lot of trash. Reusable filter cups like these for just $9.95 make life easier and save some cash every month. Just compost those grounds and rinse out the filter when you’re done. Buy a K-cup variety pack to see which blends you like best and then buy bagged grounds of the blends you know you love. You can even grind your own if you prefer. This will can save you about a quarter a day, which can add up to some serious savings on your daily cuppa joe! It can also save space in your cabinets not storing bulky boxes of k-cups.

10 under $10

6. Stop throwing your money out every time you use a Ziploc bag. They may seem cheap, but get one wet and it isn’t reusable and it definitely isn’t environmentally friendly. I like this five pack of reusable bags. At $10.99 it’s just a stretch over my list goal, but I think the variety makes it worth the extra 99 cents. If you don’t trust silicone or PEVA then it is worth it to spring for stainless steel. They’re also freezer safe!

10 under $10

7. Never lose another baby sock or ruin another bra in the wash with these color-coded mesh wash bags. At $5.99 they are definitely worth it. The excellent reviews give me more confidence in them than the cheapo one I bought at Walmart that ripped and lost its contents in the wash.

10 under $10

8. A sewing emergency kit like this one can save you money by extending the life of your wardrobe. You don’t necessarily have to invest in a sewing machine to repair a hem, sew a button back on, or patch a hole. You do however need a sewing kit. Needles, scissors, several colors of thread, etc are included. This is a bargain at $6.99 when you consider how much you could save on your wardrobe over time by simply taking better care of your clothes.

10 for under $10

9. Get a toothpaste squeeze like this one and never waste toothpaste from the tube again! We recently cut open a tube of toothpaste once we thought we couldn’t possibly get any more out. Were we wrong! A 4 pack is just $4.99.

playdoh

10. The last item on this list is solely a sanity saver. If you have kids you probably already know how invaluable a few minutes of your kids entertaining themselves can be. I was not a fan until recently. Trying to keep a class of six two-year-olds happy during Vacation Bible School made me a believer. Play-doh is inexpensive and non-toxic. This 10 pack is $7.99 or you can make your own. I’ve even seen recipes with peanut butter if your kids are prone to eat them. Any inexpensive sensory item is good to have around when you need to get something done or just drink a cup of coffee without a million interruptions.

Pick up any of these 10 under $10 and save yourself some hassle today! What are your must-have items for saving time, money, and your sanity? I’d love to hear from you.

Please follow and like us:
error

25 Frugal and Dairy-Free School Lunch Ideas

frugal and dairy free

I’m Not That Mom…

I love all those fancy photos of elaborate school lunches lovingly packed by moms and nannies and posted to Instagram accounts dedicated entirely to said lunches. They’re so fun. And not particulary frugal and dairy-free. They’re also so not me. The ones I think I could pull off rather easily (a caterpillar with veggies and grape tomatoes is an adorable idea!) my child probably wouldn’t eat. And that is okay. To each mom her own.

While I may dream of being that mom who packs inventive and unique meals on the daily in reality I am the mom throwing something together at 7 am frantically while my daughter asks why she only gets four things. Don’t I know that’s not enough?Guess what? I’ve been to school at lunch and while the cafeteria does serve more the kids aren’t eating most of the food. I pack what I am convinced she will eat. 

I’m also the mom who gets sidetracked while fixing said four things because her little brother had a poopsplosion at an inopportune time. That usually gets a laugh from the school secretary when you check your child in late. Been there, twice actually. But that’s a story for a different type of blog post!

Over the summer I decided to save money in the budget and be nicer to the planet by eliminating most one-time use products in our house. I stopped buying paper towels, paper napkins, paper plates… the logical next step is using fewer plastic baggies. Yes, I said fewer. I tapering off slowly. My wallet and my lifelong habits need a little easing into some things.

I made a list of some frugal and dairy-free lunches I plan to pack for my lactose intolerant child this school year. This is five weeks’ worth of lunch ideas to try!

Frugal and Dairy Free – the List

  1. Pretzels, hummus, and turkey pepperoni with a fruit
  2. Pinwheels and banana
  3. Mixed veggies and veggie dip on toast with rolled lunch meat on the side
  4. Cookie-cutter almond butter and jelly sandwiches with berries
  5. Birds in a blanket (sliced turkey dog in a crescent roll)
  6. Turkey pepperoni, tortilla strips, and pizza sauce
  7. Hard-boiled eggs, baby carrots, and a home-baked cookie
  8. Chicken quesadilla cut into strips
  9. Pasta salad
  10. Sweet potato fries and a slider
  11. Flatbread with pesto, bruschetta, or other topping and cherry tomatoes
  12. Mini bagel sandwich and baked chips
  13. Rolled lunch meat, crackers, baby carrots, and veggie dip or hummus
  14. Ham muffins and apple slices
  15. Sandwiches on a stick (for older kids – cube sandwich and slide onto kabob sticks)
  16. Chips and salsa or guacamole and grilled chicken
  17. Chicken nuggets with dipping sauce and baby carrots
  18. Chicken salad and toast
  19. Waffles and fruit
  20. Apple and almond butter “stacked” sandwiches
  21. Turkey dog and baked chips
  22. Wrap with fresh fruit and sliced bell pepper
  23. Salad with grilled chicken and berries
  24. Fruit salad and sliced turkey dog
  25. Taco bowls – scoop tortilla chips with leftover taco meat and a few toppings in each with sliced bell pepper

A few hacks I’ve learned to be frugal and dairy-free

Although I find the vegan ranch to be a poor substitute for the original, my daughter likes it. For simplicity’s sake, I will probably use it for a veggie dip. Hummus makes a great addition to sandwiches and wraps. Plain popcorn is also a great filler in lunches. It’s been a bit of a sanity saver at our house this summer. It’s worth noting I also buy all-natural uncured meats where possible.

If it’s inexpensive, dairy-free, and my kid won’t eat it there is nothing frugal about food that ends up in the trash can at the end of lunch. And nothing fun for a teacher dealing with a kid all afternoon after she hasn’t eaten much for lunch. Can we say hangry? We get hangry in this family. Easily.

I’d rather compromise on some things I know she’ll eat that won’t upset her tummy than waste money and food trying to get her to change her eating habits. They don’t do afternoon snacks past kindergarten. Plan accordingly.

My daughter doesn’t actually eat sliced bell pepper – yet. I may or may not sneak some in there. It can be a challenge being frugal and dairy-free since meat and cheese seem like lunch staples, but I’m going to try to be a little more creative this year than I was in Kindergarten.

This year to avoid taking up space in her bag with an ice pack to keep certain foods cool I plan to keep frozen berries in the fridge overnight and let them finish thawing in her bag. This way they keep the rest of her food cool enough as well. I know frozen applesauce pouches work well, but she can’t eat it. If we weren’t dairy-free I would probably also use frozen yogurt pouches.

What are Your Frugal Lunch Ideas?

How do you manage to stay frugal and be creative with your kids’ school lunches? I’d love to hear your tips and tricks!

Please follow and like us:
error

Back to School on a Dime

*As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.*

Send the kids back to school – can it be done in a frugal and sustainable fashion?

What I’ve been wondering is how to send them back to school inexpensively but also sustainably; I do not want to spend a fortune but I also do not want to buy cheap items that aren’t sustainable. I’ve been researching stainless steel lunch container options and they are sustainable and adorable.

They don’t feel frugal considering the price compared to plastic, but this is one of those times spending a little more money upfront and only spending it once as opposed to every single year is probably more responsible. I just HATE spending a lot of money on stuff.

Last year I threw my daughter’s backpack away. It wasn’t in good shape and it looked disgusting. Yes, it probably could’ve been salvaged, and yes I feel a little guilty about being so wasteful. I donated her lunch bag and plastic sandwich boxes. We are tired of plastic and she’d outgrown Paw Patrol phase. I feel good about donating things we don’t use. I don’t feel so good about throwing something away, but it looked a little too nasty for goodwill.

First Grade – Frugal and Sustainable

This year my daughter goes to first grade. We are fortunate to live in a district that only requires a $35 supply fee and they provide everything in the classroom. All we have to buy is a backpack and lunch gear (if they aren’t eating cafeteria food). I’m thinking this is a great opportunity to be a little more sustainable in our choices. We are already making the switch to stainless steel at home, so why not continue? I’m still cheap!

We chose to steer her toward more quality options and use them longer. We got also got a little more creative this year with her lunch bag. Our first stop was Academy since they have great prices on kids footwear and last year we got an inexpensive backpack that fit a kindergartener more than the options we found at Target. Since this is the tax-free weekend in Arkansas and we waited for Daddy to get off work before shopping this afternoon the selection was pretty limited.

What We Bought

We quickly settled on quality over price since the price point I was after was gone anyway. We got her this Jansport half pint backpack with a lifetime warranty for $29.99 (if you click the link you’ll see it is $5 less online) and a pair of BCG Prestige running shoes. Total spent was $54.98. I will launder the backpack when needed and she can use it again next year.

frugal and sustainable

Our next stop was Duluth Trading, which is not a kids store, but they were participating in the tax-free weekend and my husband gets a 40% discount. Our daughter had her heart set on a pencil bag and we wanted a better quality bag for lunches.

The Kavu lunch totes are excellent quality but were a little large for her. She also had her heart set on purple, so we found this canvas zip-top bag just the right size for a sandwich box, snack item, and kid’s water bottle. She also wanted a pencil bag so daddy directed her to this zippered pouch called a parts bag.

The purple bag will be perfect for when school is out for her to carry a tablet and headphones, note pad, pencils, or other items. Our total price with employee discount was $23.78.

frugal and sustainable

Since the bag is on the smaller side I settled on these stainless steel sandwich boxes on Amazon for $11.99 each. I found less expensive ones, but the reviews were not great.

Our total amount spent was $102.74 and everything we bought will be used past this school year. I don’t think we did too bad on the frugal or sustainable fronts. It also fits my budget quite nicely. Tell me how your back to school shopping is going. I’d love to hear your frugal and sustainable shopping hacks!

Please follow and like us:
error

Our Emergency: Why We Cash Flow Medical Bills

If only I’d known how timely my post schedule was…

Just Tuesday I posted Emergency! Why You Need an Emergency Fund Now! I talked about how this particular item is our financial focus right now and where we are in the baby steps. Little did I know that Wednesday we would experience an emergency. Murphy must’ve heard me talking about him.

Our Emergency

In case you don’t follow @alifeonadime on Instagram, here is a little recap I posted after the dust settled:

My newfound love affair with glass is over. This dispenser shattered on the tile and sent us running to the ER this afternoon. 
Not long after I tried to deter my 2 year old from the lower shelves by storing things in bins he snuck in and pulled the dispenser off the shelf. 
We thought it was safe from his reach. We were wrong. Thankfully he appears to have avoided any permanent damage but we should know for sure in a few days. Praying that little thumb keeps moving. 
Today was by far my scariest moment as a parent yet. And I saw this kid angel flighted to Little Rock at 2 days old. This was unexpected and the sounds of glass and screaming are not going away from my memory any time soon. 
I am only posting this because he is currently sleeping on me. I am soooo thankful we have savings however small and insurance in which his deductible has been met. This is why we need emergency funds. Money was not on our list of concerns sitting in the ER through x-rays and shots and sutures. He was. I am so thankful we are not the typical household that could not cover a $1000 expense. I sincerely hope you aren’t either.

When I sat down two weeks ago and mapped out my blog posts for the month I had no idea that I would be the one needing them most. I guess this week I’m just posting my personal diary.

Medical Bills Happen

If you are breathing and especially if you have children you can expect medical bills. My husband has glaucoma. His eye exams are more in-depth than what vision insurance typically pays. He also goes every six months as opposed to once a year (ca-ching). If the pressure has changed, and it usually has, he gets a new prescription eye drop (ca-ching) and has a follow-up in two weeks (ca-ching) to see if it is relieving the pressure. If it isn’t, you guessed it, he gets new drops (ca-ching_ and another recheck (ca-ching).

Insurance Makes Things Interesting

To make things more interesting insurance takes a while to process the claims so it can be a few months before we see the bill. It is not uncommon to get two or three bills at once and sometimes they are already 60 plus days past his appointment date before we ever see the amount owed. Depending on the size of the amount due I typically just pay the oldest first and then pay the rest off in two or three chunks. It’s not perfect but it works. It seems expensive but he never seems to meet his deductible. Gotta love insurance.

To make our insurance situation even trickier our kids were double insured until last year when I left my full-time job. Prior to that, we hadn’t paid a dime for our son’s physical therapy that hadn’t been refunded. After my insurance expired we were surprised by a $600 bill from the therapy clinic. I called and it turned out that even though my insurance was secondary it was picking up the tab on everything while the primary insurance policy was just applying everything to the deductible.

January 1st rolled around and we had to start over on our deductible and there was no secondary insurance paying the balance. So we are making payments on that as well.

Why We Do Things This Way

You may ask why we don’t just pay the medical bills and be done. That is a valid question. Technically if you follow the baby steps you pay off all your debt before finishing your emergency fund.

We are also a single-income family at the moment. Heaven forbid my husband were to lose his job our little medical bills would not be our biggest concern. Our focus would be on buying food to feed our kids, keeping the lights on, and paying the mortgage so we could stay in our house. Paid off medical bills and little to no money in savings would not help us in that situation.

On the flip side, if we had an emergency fund not only could we feed our kids, keep the lights on, and stay in the house for a few months until we found a new source of income, we could also continue to make smaller payments on the medical bills. When it comes to personal finance you have to do what makes sense for your family. This makes sense for our family and helps us feel more secure.

Please follow and like us:
error

Emergency! Why You Need an Emergency fund Now!

In Case of Emergency…

Sooner or later an emergency is bound to happen. Sometimes more than one will happen in a short time. Sometimes they’re not so little. Whether you call it your E-fund, your Murphy repellent, or just your savings you need at least three to six months worth of expenses set aside. This money is not your 401K, your Roth IRA, or another type of investment account that comes with penalties for early withdrawal.

This is a separate account (think high-yield savings, traditional savings, or even a money market) you can easily access funds from when you need them.

What is an Emergency?

An emergency is an unavoidable, unplanned circumstance that leads to an unavoidable, unplanned large expense. Think job loss, a major illness, unplanned leave-of-absence from work, not plane tickets are cheap so we’re going to Maui. True situations you need to make sure that as unpleasant or traumatic as they can be your family is ready to weather the storm financially.

Not ready for one?

Most Americans aren’t; in fact, according to a recent Bankrate survey referenced here, most American households can’t even handle a $1,000 setback. This in itself is an emergency! If you really think about it, $1,000 doesn’t go far in a true emergency. It might not even cover your deductible if you settled for a low premium, high deductible plan. It probably won’t replace the old hot water heater that seems like a ticking time bomb in your basement either.

So what do you do?

You need to adjust your budget to start saving for that emergency before there is one. Ever heard of Murphy’s Law? “If anything can go wrong, it will.” Isn’t that the truth! Don’t wait for an emergency to start your emergency fund! Look at your monthly budget and see if you have any wiggle room to add to your savings. Don’t have a budget? That’s an even bigger emergency! See my Budgeting pages for information about how to get started.

Any amount you can set aside will be beneficial. If you just save $100 for a year at the end of that year you will be in a more comfortable position than most American households.

Maybe you have a side hustle. If you don’t, but want suggestions, see my article “How do You Hustle? Legitimate Side Hustle Ideas,” for more information. Instead of throwing the additional stream(s?) of income at debt consider funding your emergency fund first.

However you choose to fund your emergency fund, be sure to start! You can’t prevent bad things from happening, but we can do our best to make sure we are prepared if and when they do happen. Don’t let that inevitable $1,000 emergency wreak havoc on your family’s finances; get your emergency fund ready as soon as possible!

My family is in Baby Step 3; we are out of consumer debt and beefing up our emergency fund. We currently have almost 32% of our goal saved. I am trying to get creative stretching our budget and working some small side hustles to add to it. You can follow our progress on Instagram under my handle @alifeonadime. We are 9 days into July and I’ve managed to save $30 so far! It isn’t much, but every little bit helps! Follow along for updates on my family and share yours with me here in the comments! I would love to cheer you on too!

Please follow and like us:
error

Sinking Funds

avoid that sinking feeling

Avoid the Sinking Feeling that Comes with not Planning Ahead

Set Money Aside for Larger Expenses in Advance

Sinking funds are an excellent way to cover infrequent, larger expenses and avoid that sinking feeling you get when you reach for the credit card to cover an expense you knew was coming but just didn’t plan for. They aren’t as complicated as they may sound either! We used them to cash flow home renovation projects and major purchases long before we knew what they were called.

In essence, a sinking fund is a separate bank account or cash envelope you contribute to for a specific, typically larger expense. Say you plan to “sink” money into vehicle maintenance, a new(er) car fund, or save for a down payment on a house. You may pay your insurance premiums quarterly or annually for a discount. You expect these expenses and set aside money on a regular basis. These are all sinking funds. You may have one or more going and simply refer to it by its purpose; the car fund, new house fund, maintenance fund…

More recently we employed the sinking fund method to cash flow our property tax bill. We set aside a specific amount each month for three months and then paid the bill in full. This avoided an uncomfortable budget deficit one month or the need to raid our primary savings.

Or, you may find it beneficial to set up sinking funds for other recurring expenses that add up but don’t necessarily happen every month. Examples include a birthday fund, Christmas gift fund, clothing, etc. Avoid that sinking feeling and the urge to go into debt when the kids hit that inevitable growth spurt or tear through the knees of all their good pants.

You know it’s going to happen, so why not plan for it?

If you have any questions or just want to join the conversation drop them in the comments to this post or send me an email. I would love to talk more.

Please follow and like us:
error

Healthy on a Budget is Possible and Here’s How

Yes, you CAN eat healthy on a budget! Very healthy!

Put down that boxed meal and hear me out…

This post is coming to you per the suggestion of a follower. Not following along yet? Just click add your email address and click the pink box to the right of the large image at the top of the post. If you have suggestions or questions about future content click here to contact me.

I know it can be hard to get a meal, any meal, on the table in a decent amount of time when you work full-time, have kids to haul to various activities. Heck, it’s hard if you’re home with the kids all day. Any of the above scenarios can make you want to give up and dial take-out. In fact, according to the USDA Americans spend more money eating food away from home than they do on groceries. And we have for almost a decade! You may be tempted to just open up a box and cook up a meal in 30 minutes or less. Been there, done that, gained the weight…

Wanna know a secret?

You can make a healthy meal from scratch in one dish in under 30 minutes as well. It doesn’t always require meal prep in advance either. Still with me? Good. Cooking at home can be healthier, less expensive, and have a ripple effect across your lifestyle and budget!

Instead of pulling up to the drive-thru on the way home prepare a simple, healthy meal (like the sheet pan chicken posted on my Recipes page) with a side salad and homemade dressing. The dressing is easy; pour a little olive oil in a jar, add minced garlic and other spices to taste, put the lid on, and shake. Voila! Salad dressing without preservatives! Maybe cut up a cantaloupe (under $2 in season here in Northwest Arkansas) or other fresh fruit for dessert.

After dinner, you probably feel pretty good (instead of bloated and icky from your fast food meal that sat who knows how long under a warming light) so you gather up the kids, or the dog, your spouse, and take a walk or play together outside as a family.

Not only did you eat well, but you also got some healthy movement in too without really even thinking about it. Over time this can result in a smaller waistline, fewer medications/doctor visits (even just a reduction in indigestion would be nice, right?), and money typically spent dealing with those issues can now go to beef up your Emergency fund or pay down debt.

Examples of healthy meals that can be made inexpensively are included on my Meal Plan on a Dime page. Eating healthy on a budget is so much easier if you make a meal plan before you go grocery shopping. This helps ensure only what you need goes on the list and saves you the headache of wandering the aisles hoping for some dinner inspiration before settling on the frozen food aisle.

Dinner doesn’t have to be complicated; you need a protein, a few vegetables, and if you choose a (preferably) whole grain. One handy trick I like to use is to make sure to eat the rainbow; the food on your plate should be really colorful, not monotone. This will help you make sure you are getting a better variety in your diet. I am no nutritionist, but it’s a good rule of thumb.

Don’t have a lot of time to cook or just don’t like to cook? Batch cook! You can easily double a recipe and freeze one batch to heat up for an effortless meal on a day you’re not feeling the motivation or won’t have time to prep a meal. I love batch cooking a turkey meatloaf or in the winter chicken pot pie filling. It makes the second time around a breeze! Either place the frozen batch in the fridge the day before or allow more time in the oven.

Batch cooking can also come in really handy if you are fixing a meal for friends or family. Just double the recipe and you won’t be left wondering what you’ll be eating for dinner when you get back from delivering the gifted meal.

Portion control is also a lot easier at home than in a restaurant. This is both healthier and good for the budget. We eat pasta two to three times a month, which is very economical and filling. Pasta dishes at restaurants tend to be much larger than a typical, healthy portion. It is much easier to control how much you eat when you control the plate size!

Stretching your meat out is both good for your bottom dollar and your waistline; when cooking pasta dishes opt for a meat sauce or make it a casserole and use less than you typically would by cooking up meatballs or individual chicken breasts or tenderloins to serve on the plate next to the pasta.

Sheet pan meals are an excellent way to stretch your meat as well; simply chop up several veggies and add chopped meat to the mixture. Clean up is a breeze when everything is cooked together as well!

Take a dish you typically order out and hack it to make it cheaper, easier, and healthier to prepare and eat at home! This can be a great way to get your “treat” meals in without breaking the bank going out to eat when the urge to eat it hits. If the ingredients are simple enough keep them on hand so you can make them without making an extra trip to the store. Incorporate them into your regular meal plan.

It helps a lot to have ten to fifteen tried and true recipes you know you can pull off easily, are health conscious and don’t have expensive, hard to find ingredients. Once you have a good set of recipes to fall back on meal planning and list making gets easier and less stressful. Free recipe apps and food blogs can help a lot for inspiration and cook times. Eventually, you will find yourself coming up with your own favorites and new combinations.

What are you waiting for? Get cooking! Can’t figure out how to hack a recipe to make it healthier? Reduce the sugar and/or salt. Reduce the portion size. These are always good places to start.

Would you like to see healthy, budget-friendly recipes/meal plans in your inbox on a regular basis? Let me know! If enough people are interested we will make it happen!

Please follow and like us:
error

Birthday Party Budget Breakdown

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

How’d we do?

I previously posted how we planned to host the kids’ birthday party on a $150 budget including food and kids’ gifts. You can click here to read that if you missed it. Here is the budget breakdown:

budget breakdown

We spent $69 for martial arts lessons for our daughter and she is loving the classes! Our little white belt just earned her first stripe this week for learning her first basic form!

We also spent a total of $54.93 on the previously mentioned sit on tractor and T-ball set from Amazon.

I also spent $12.92 at Target on a felt tool set for my son and favor bags (which I forgot to fill, so they’re ready for next year!). That made a total of $136.85 of the $150 budget.

But what about the food?

budget breakdown
Pickup portion of food

Where is the food in the budget breakdown you ask? We didn’t have to use the budget for the party food! My husband helped a coworker after work one day and was given $40 in return. I used that unexpected money and paid for burger patties, turkey dogs, buns, cake mix, frosting, a fruit bowl, condiments, lettuce, and tomatoes with cash!

So for the budget breakdown purposes, we were able to use $13.15 elsewhere in our monthly budget. Like the newbie I am at this blogging thing I forgot to take pictures of the spread before everyone dug in!

Not too shabby! Would you call that under or over? Technically I think it could go either way since we did spend money, but it wasn’t all from the budget. Let me know what you think!

Have you hosted any parties lately? How did you do on your budget? Let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear how you entertain your loved ones on a dime!

budget breakdown
Play Ball!
Please follow and like us:
error

What Minimalism Means to Me

To me, minimalism means less is more:

Less stress

I am no longer stressed out by my stuff. This hasn’t always been true. I’ve spent a good part of my adult life stressed out by stuff. Read my previous post, Beginnings of a More Minimalist Approach for more on that. This includes stressing about what I didn’t have; when I learned to let go of the excess I did have I also learned to let go of the things I thought I had to have.

Today minimalism means I no longer worry and stress about how or when I can buy what I want. I just no longer want most of it. This is a very freeing feeling. When it comes to most wants I can either take it or leave it. It no longer factors into my happiness. A major win here!

Less is more… time

Once I had fewer things to maintain, it meant dusting and cleaning, in general, took up a lot less of my time. Most of what is out is in use. Now that the kids have fewer toys they play with just about EVERYTHING they have! What they don’t play with or age out of promptly goes to the donate box or bag and out of the house.

I can see what I have/find what I need when I open a drawer or cabinet. If I don’t see it I probably don’t have it. The fact that I don’t have it probably doesn’t bother me now. In the past it oftentimes would.

Less is more of what matters

Now we live in a 1320 square foot house. It is smaller than average maybe, but certainly not tiny and it feels just right for us. I still have a few things to pare down; this is not a one and done approach where you go through one purge and everything is perfectly minimal from there on out. Life changes, kids grow, and priorities get reevaluated. I am able to focus on the people in my house instead of the things. That’s just as it should be.

less is more

Please follow and like us:
error